LXHotkey 0.1.1 released.

After some quiet time it happened again. We started to release. This time it was the key strikes configurator to be first. Some little fixes done and new version is ready for you! Stay tuned, yet some other updates will be for you soon!

New release tarball download link:
lxhotkey-0.1.1.tar.xz – SHA1: 2f41397a07dc3ae19607be23f61f09cdb93c8a3d

Changes since initial release 0.1.0 (see git log for details):

  • Added detection for LXDE-pi session.
  • Fixed using ‘<Primary>’ keyword by recent GTK+.
  • Added optional scrollbars if there is not enough space.
  • Translations updates.

LXTerminal 0.3.1 released.

This is an security and bugfix update. However, there is also minor feature added to enhance usability.

Tarball download link:
lxterminal-0.3.1.tar.gz – SHA1: 51554be19cbe4ebbc8e3710935fa54c31338fabf

Changes since previous release 0.3.0 (see git log for details):

  • Fix CVE-2016-10369, a Denial-of-Service vulnerability.
  • Fix bug that prevents changing tab name, which is introduced since 0.3.0.
  • The keyboard shortcut can be changed by pressing key combinations.

Benchmark: Memory Usage: LXQt desktop environment vs XFCE

It has always been rumored that Qt is bloated so programs written in Qt should be bloated. Some even argued that the LXDE developers made a wrong decision on the migration to LXQt.
Why not replace the assumptions with some experiments?
In fact, LXQt 0.11 even uses slightly less memory than XFCE (with gtk+ 2). After cold boot, LXQt uses 112 MB in the testing environment. Continue reading “Benchmark: Memory Usage: LXQt desktop environment vs XFCE”

Memory Usage of LXQt 0.9

Since the release of LXQt 0.9 several days ago, many people are curious about its memory usage since in the release announcement we mentioned the use of two libraries from KDE framework 5. Don’t worry! They are just “pure Qt libraries” without other KDE dependencies (Thank you KDE guys!). Good engineers always base their design desicions on careful analysis, experiments, and measurements, not politics. If a library works pretty well, it does not really matter where it comes from or it belongs to which camp. If it’s free software and it’s suitable for our need, I’d say “use it”. Here are some numbers of memory usage after cold boot. Continue reading “Memory Usage of LXQt 0.9”

LXPanel 0.8.0 pre release testing.

After some development, it’s time to release next feature version of LXPanel. The release goals for 0.8 were:

  • complete multi-monitor support
  • improve and further simplify plugins API

Now that it was done, and numerous bugs fixed along with that, LXPanel has come to release time, which is scheduled in about 2 weeks. We would appreciate all the testing and feedback on it. The fresh sources are in GIT repository, as usual. The changelog since version 0.7.2 is big enough, you can find it in the sources or read online.

I also would like to ask all our translators to come into Pootle and translate it. I would ask to read the Wiki if you didn’t do that lately. Thank you in advance, everyone.

In memory of Razor-qt

Although people often compare LXDE and the “so-called” Qt port, LXQt with each other, they are actually from different code bases.
The most parts of LXQt are actually built on top of razor-qt, a lightweight Qt-based DE with the same philosophy as LXDE. We reorganized the source code of razor-qt and removed unused pieces. Then we ported several LXDE components to Qt and also developed some new ones. Hence it’s more the merge of developers than the merge of the actual source code. That’s why they have slightly different feature sets. Without the work of razor-qt project, we can’t have LXQt now.  Its developers deserved the credit. Since the story is too long for the tiny “About” dialog, I wrote the blog post here to thank their contributions.
Long live free software!

Status update for “LXDE”

Yes, it’s about the gtk+ version LXDE, not LXQt.
Previously, razor-qt and lxde project merged and formed LXQt project, which just had a 0.8 release. Though the original plan was to migrate to Qt, this does not mean that LXDE is dropped. As many of the users have noted, many LXDE gtk+ components got updates recently. LXDE is still actively developed and maintained by the developers lead by Andrej N. Gritsenko (LStranger) and as long as gtk+ 2 is in use, I believe that they’ll keep working on it. We even got some patches for gtk+ 3 recently. Yes, gtk+ 3. This does not mean that LXDE is going to use gkt+ 3, but it’s a clear indicator that LXDE is not dead. If you’re not a fan of LXQt, don’t worry, you can still use LXDE. Also I want to say “thank you” again to LStranger who work really hard to keep LXDE so others can have some time to focus on LXQt while keeping our promise to the users.
About LXQt, the 0.8 version is quite stable and we have the required features, but of course it’s not good enough and have room for improvement. We’ll keep working on that, too. For the part I’m responsible for, the file manager, I’ll try to add the features that exist in the gtk+ versions but abscent in the Qt port. Also, I’m going to do more bechmarks for LXQt recently. Other developers are working on code cleanup and removing dependency on X11 so we can move to Wayland later.Both LXQt and LXDE are actively developed. Stay tunned! 🙂