Category Archives: Community

PCLXDE

The PCLinuxOS Team has released a PCLinuxOS version with LXDE as the default Desktop, called PCLXDE:

PCLXDE 2009.4 is a minimal self-booting/installable Linux Live CD that features the LXDE desktop environment along with a small suite of lightweight applications designed for use on low end computer systems. It is small, fast and fun. Designed for P III or better. Does not work on K6/2 processors. But wait there’s more!

lxde2

lxde4

Features include

Midori – Web Browser with Flash and Multimedia playback
Abiword -Word Processor (Get Open Office available after hd install)
ePDFView – PDF Viewer
Leafpad -Tex Editor.
Transmission – Bittorrent Client
Emesene – Instant Messenger
XChat – IRC Client
Sylpheed – Email and News Reader
GRDC – Remote Desktop Client
GPicView – Graphic Viewer
MTPaint – Graphic Drawing Client
Alsaplayer – Music Player
Mplayer – Video Player
PCMan – File Manager
Simple Backup – Backup Software
Xfburn – CD/DVD Burning Software
Gnome  PPP – Dial up Client
File Roller – Archiving Software
PCLinuxOS Control Center – Adminstration Tool
LXDECC – LXDE Control Center (provided by Lord UnR34l)
AddLocale – Convert LXDE into your language
XPat2 – Card Playing Suite
Tiwtux – Twitter Client
Grsync – Graphical Rsync Client
Virtualbox Additions added

and much more all fitted into a 300 mb Live CD for fast downloading and installation. Not not only that but an additional 11,000 programs available after hard drive install through the Synaptic Software Manager!

Ibiblio Download

Linuxtracker Torrent

md5sum c719f78186b13236d2698107f32e8f7d  pclinuxos-lxde-2009.4.isoPCLXDE is another MyPCLinuxOS community project. PCLXDE project headed by Neal Brooks.

Source: http://www.pclinuxos.com/

LXDE one of the largest open-source teams in the world

I just found this factoid on Ohloh and I am amazed to read this:

LXDE: Very large, active development team
Over the past twelve months, 26 developers contributed new code to LXDE. This is one of the largest open-source teams in the world, and is in the top 2% of all project teams on Ohloh. For this measurement, Ohloh considered only recent changes to the code. Over the entire history of the project, 46 developers have contributed. (http://www.ohloh.net/p/lxde/factoids/)

I believe everyone in the LXDE team still considers the project as a rather small project with a small team. There have been many changes and advances, but I would have never guessed that LXDE is one of the big projects. If we see it in regards to Gnome and KDE, the relations become different though. Gnome has 432 developers according to Ohloh and KDE even 482 code contributors. XFCE shows up with 12 coders during the last twelve months.

I wonder how many people actually work in different desktop projects at the same time. We have friendly relationships with many contributors working on different projects already. Chris Wickert for example is a core member of LXDE and at the same time taking care of XFCE packages in Fedora. In the end we all share the same ideas and goals about free and open source and we actually share a lot of the code with many projects, especially with our friends from XFCE.

Everyone, keep up the good work! I hope to see more exchange and friendships among our projects. We welcome everyone to work and cooperate with us even if we have some different views sometimes on specific questions. In the end it is cooperation what makes us – as a software project and a community – advance faster and become better.

LXDE start pages in Portuguese

The LXDE.org start pages are now available in Portuguese thanks to Henrique P. Machado (zehrique) from Brazil who has translated the content. The set up of the language was done together with Mwei from Taiwan. We welcome contributors who are interested in having the LXDE start pages in their language. Please contact us through the mailing list of the translation project.

lxde.org-lightweight-x11-desktop-environment-portugues

The Portuguese Introduction of LXDE

O “Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment”, é um ambiente de área de trabalho extremamente rápido, ágil e poupador de energia. Ele é mantido por uma comunidade internacional de desenvolvedores e vem com uma bonita interface com o usuário, suporte a múltiplos idiomas, atalhos de teclado padrões e características adicionais, como um gerenciador de arquivos com navegação em abas. O LXDE exige menos da CPU e consome menos memória RAM. Ele é desenhado especialmente para computadores em nuvem com especificações de hardware limitadas, como netbooks, dispositivos móveis (ex.: MIDs) ou computadores antigos. O LXDE pode ser instalado em distribuições como Ubuntu ou Debian. Ele provê uma rápida interação com o desktop, conectando-se facilmente com aplicativos na nuvem. O LXDE suporta uma gama enorme de programas, que podem ser instalados localmente com os sistemas Linux. O código-fonte do LXDE está licenciado parcialmente sob os termos da Licença Pública Geral (GPL) e parcialmente sob a LGPL.

Join the Translation Project

Please join the translation project, subscribe to the mailing list and add your name into our wiki page for the Translation project.

Links

* Translation Project http://wiki.lxde.org/en/Category:Translations

* Translation Mailing List http://mailinglist.lxde.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/translation

* LXDE Online Translation of components http://pootle.lxde.bsnet.se

If you don’t like to be forced to use gnome standards, please join xdg mailing list.

The current standard/specifications followed by most of the major UNIX desktop enviromnents, such as Gnome, KDE, XFCE, LXDE, and ROX, is called freedesktop.org.  See http://www.freedesktop.org/ for detail.

Freedesktop.org is formed by a group of developers. Developers duscusses on the so called ‘xdg’ mailing list to come up with some specs which will be followed by major desktop environments. The specs developed by Freedesktop.org are not formal standards, but they are widely used in Gnome, KDE, and XFCE.

lxde-fdoFreedesktop.org standards defines the way window managers work, they way how file types are recognized, how icons are named, the way to define the main application menu, to exchange data between applications and different desktop environments, and more.

The process to form those specs, however, is quite inefficient and problematic. All discussions are held on their xdg mailing list. If someone has a proposal, he/she then writes a draft of the spec for it, and then post it to  the mailing list. Then, if you’re lucky enough, or you’re a big guy (famous Gnome or KDE developers), you’ll get attentions and some feedbacks. After lenghthy discussions, if there are no obvious objections, the draft will be added to freedesktop.org repository, and was posted on their wiki. This is roughly how the specs are formed. Nevertheless, if there is no one implement your spec, your spec soon became useless. That means, either Gnome or KDE should support your proposal, otherwise no one will use it. How can something be called ‘standard’ when nobody is following it?

Later, if someone has some good ideas regarding to improving the spec, he/she can post his/her proposal in the mailing list with a patch, and if there is no objection, the patch *might* be applied to the spec. However, once the original author/maintainer of that spec doesn’t like your idea, your proposal will never be accepted. Or even worse, your messages got omitted by the original author/maintainer of existing specs, then there is no way to improve anything in existing specs. This is a real problem in freedesktop.org.

Besides, another big issue here is, most of the specs/standards are advocated by Gnome or KDE developers, and they don’t even consider the needs of other desktop environments. The so-called cross-desktop standards are actually well-implemented in Gnome and KDE only. XFCE tried hard to follow all those standards, but never get everything work flawlessly. LXDE tried to follow those specs, too, but found that many of the specs are very complicated and inefficient, which can slow down our desktops and add bloatness. Nowadays they are trying to add more things, and get modern desktops more and more complicated. It’s nearly impossible to keep lightweight if you want to follow ‘all’ the standards developed by Gnome and KDE. So that’s why we only supports the parts we need.

Recent changes in freedesktop.org, like PolicyKit and ConsoleKit, are mainly developed and implemented by Gnome-related developers. Then the KDE guys are forced to follow them. They even drop their well-designed and high performance IPC mechanism, DCOP, and adopt dbus, which is mainly advocated by Gnome developers. Some people even suggested that KDE should replace their own VFS with GIO/GVFS developed by Gnome. Some new technologies are developed by Gnome first, and then they wrote freedesktop.org specs for them. Later, those things are copied to KDE and they soon have their KDE equivalence. Unfortunately, all other desktop environments are forced to follow those standards whether they really need it or not, to keep the compatability with those two major desktop environments.

Why should we always be forced to follow all those things we don’t like or don’t even need? If we don’t follow them, we lost compatibility with many existing Gnome/GTK+ and KDE programs. In addition, they modify the specs frequently, and always break backward compatibility. So our precious time are wasted on re-implement everything in their new specs and try to fix all broken compatibility left by them.  It’s enough!

Sometimes things developed by the two major DEs are quite awesome and useful. However sometimes those specs just don’t suitable for other DEs and they didn’t consider the needs of users of DEs other than Gnome and KDE.

So, every enthusiastic developers/users of lightweight desktop environments, please join their xdg mailinst list and join their discussions and let them listen to your voice. If you don’t want to be forced to use things developed by Gnome and KDE, please let them hear your voice in the mailing list. Since they are now moving gnome libs into GTK+, like it or not, all gtk+ applications will be affected. Desktop environments other than Gnome and KDE might have some special needs and goals and those Gnome standards might not suitable for us sometimes. So we need to let them hear our voice and we should be part of the decision making.

So, please, join the xdg mailing list and get involved if you can.

Subscribe to xdg mailing list at http://lists.freedesktop.org/mailman/listinfo/xdg .

Nominate LXDE for the Community Choice Awards 2009

cca_nominatePlease nominate LXDE for the Community Choice Awards 2009 till May 29, 2009.

LXDE was started already in 2005 in Taiwan and has spread all over the world. During the last year the project made big advances. New components have been added and older ones were updated. We have formed a viable translation project with people translating components from Peru to Egypt to Japan to Germany and all around the globe. LXDE is now included in many Linux distros, was ported to Google Android, has been shown to work on BSD, and was established as a Desktop Project for OpenSolaris.

During my recent travel to China I discovered that many of the small Chinese hardware producers customize LXDE and use it on their devices. LXDE offers new business opportunities for these producers. I have received many emails of people using LXDE like in whole universities in Brazil.

Please tell us your story how you use LXDE or participate in the project and please show your support for LXDE and the growing community by nominating the project for the community choice awards 2009. The LXDE project is still a project of a small community, but looking to who is participating, we already achieved to form a truly international project, which inspires me to continue supporting the project and freely licensed Open Source projects in general.

The message of LXDE: International Free and Open Source development across cultures and regions works! Faster, more lightweight and energy efficient systems are possible!

There are many projects that deserve to get this awards. I certainly believe LXDE should be one of them. I nominated LXDE for:

  • Best Project
  • Best Commercial Open Source Project
  • Most Likely to Change The Way You do Everything

Please join us. Thank you for your support!

Important Dates

  • May 6 – Nominations open
  • May 29 – Nominations close
  • June 22 – Finalists announced, voting opens
  • July 20 – Voting closes
  • July 23 – Winners are announced at OSCON
Links

LXDE speaks 13 languages!

Three weeks have passed (was supposed to deliver some statistics last week but not that much had happened so I took the weekend to rest =)) since last report and we have had another huge progress in the code, most of it has happened the last week though.

As we approach the imminent release of GPicView the translators have been busy to complete the new strings and most of them have also completed and updated other parts of the project. It’s nice to see how interested the community are in completing the translation effort for their language. In early May we had four languages (and English) completed – Arabic, Spanish, Japanese and Swedish. I am pleased to be able to report that we have twelve (not including English!) individual language codes fully translated. We even got some new languages added these weeks that are completed. That’s a really fulfilling experience. Big up to Urudu (a sole maintainer does both Urdu and Urdu as spoken in Pakistan).
Another great achievement this last week was the progress from Dutch and Indonesian, Dutch was placed in the need work category (less than 50% completed) and are now completed. Indonesian wasn’t that far off but not in the runners up category (90% or more done).

Let’s get down to the figures for real then, the completed translations enable 1200 000 000 people to use LXDE in their native tounge. We have doubled the numbers in just about a month work! By completing the runners up category we will add another 411 200 000 native speakers. And by all you who get around by using a secondary language (English, Spanish, French?) the number of enabled users are truly amazing! The translators really deserv a big hand for their great work in connecting people.

I always try to get some languages to deliver, we have a sad category I call “Needs work“. These are not by any means minor languages but their progress is stalled and their completion rate is under 50%. We call members of the community who speak Afrikaans, Bulgarian (new language added just yesterday!), Galician, Korean, Norweigan Bokmål, Norgweigan Nynorsk, Farsi/Persian, Turkish or Vietnamese to the stands. If you show up and can complete the translation effort we could add another 275 000 000 people to the stash. Please note here that the Chinese translations (as spoken in China and as spoken in Taiwan) are not completed and would bring another 1 000 000 000+ people to the totals. We are a large community, but why stop at large when great is near?

If you know any of the not completed languages or want to translate LXDE in to a new language that we at this stage not try to support please contact us (via the mailinglist, the forums, me directly or by IRC, any means would probably do – e-mail is the best because of time zones=)).
If your language is already in LXDE in some state it is enabled in the Pootle server and it’s easy as reading the guide to get started. Or if you rather would like to get the files and use a PO-file editor there are guides for that approach. Help us become a well translated and enabled Desktop Environment.

Summer of Code slots available for LXDE through Debian

There are still opportunities for people interested in working on LXDE as a summer of code project. We are in touch for example with the Debian project, who offered to give spots to students from the LXDE project for example for a better integration. Also, new student projects are welcome. The summer of code program offers student stipends of 4500,- USD for studying and development work on specific free and open source projects.

Please check it out and apply as soon as possible. Also get in touch with us, so we can support your application.

The Debian program is at:
http://socghop.appspot.com/org/show/google/gsoc2009/debian and http://wiki.debian.org/gsoc and on #debian-soc on irg.debian.org.

The application deadline is approaching soon. It is important to apply before 19:00 UTC April 3rd. Applications can still be adapted and specified with mentors after that date. You might regard your first application as a version 0.1 maybe. So, please, dont be shy. Good luck!

Links:

http://socghop.appspot.com/document/show/program/google/gsoc2009/timeline

LXDE on OpenSolaris

Alfred Peng from Wuhan, China started to port LXDE to OpenSolaris. I met him in Singapore and could see how it is running already pretty smoothly.

Opensolaris with LXDE

Since it’s a GTK based desktop environment, some of the applications (pcmanfm, lxpanel, lxappearance, lxlauncher etc.) can be easily built and installed. But some still don’t work. The network manager lxnm is one of them, also lxtask and lxterminal. Good news is that the OpenSolaris nwam manager works great with small memory footprint :) The app lxmusic, which is the media player for LXDE, depends on xmms libraries. This could be a limitation for the distribution as xmms links against a lot of patented codecs. Maybe GStreamer framework could be a better choice from a distribution’s point of view. Anyway, I can still use Songbird/Rhythmbox/Totem.

To compare with my personal experience of Xfce, LXDE runs better on OpenSolaris. Xfce is a little bit sluggish on my box (configuration issue?). LXDE’s performance and memory footprint are really impressive to me. It provides a nice alternative for the resource-limited desktop users (Eee PC users for example). On the other hand, the desktop layout of LXDE is pretty similar with Windoz. I guess this is because a big bunch of the developers are from Taiwan :) This helps easier migration for users from the Windoz land. As the LXDE applications are still in the 0.x stage, please feel free to get in touch with the community (mailing list or IRC) for any problems you find.

The first set of spec files have been checked in to the SFE reporitory (SFElx*, SFEgpicview, SFEgtknetcat, SFEopenbox and SFEpcmanfm). If you’re familiar with CBE, it’ll be very easy for you to build and install LXDE on OpenSolaris. Those who are interested can also refer to the CBE instructions.

Actually the porting initiative comes from Mario Behling‘s introduction of LXDE on the Singapore Linux meetup group event in January. The frozen-bubble porting was also after the event :) It’s nice to talk with him face to face and get to know a lot of community people behind: pcman, jserv and many more in the Asia region. Stay tune, I believe there will be more to come from LXDE community. (http://blogs.sun.com/pengyang/entry/lxde_lightweight_x11_desktop_environment)

lxde-opensolaris-alfred-peng
LXDE on OpenSolaris with Alfred Peng from Wuhan, China

Links

* Alfred Peng – Blog http://blogs.sun.com/pengyang/
* LXDE on Opensolaris http://blogs.sun.com/pengyang/entry/lxde_lightweight_x11_desktop_environment
* Opensolaris LXDE desktop community http://opensolaris.org/os/community/desktop/communities/lxde/
* Opensolaris in the LXDE Wiki http://wiki.lxde.org/en/OpenSolaris

LXDE Gathering at National University of Singapore with LinuxNUS

I had a talk and discussion with students and Open Source and Free Software supporters organized by LinuxNUS at the National University of Singapore this week. It really amazes me to see the high level of knowledge here about free and open source software and current developments and I am happy to say, that I learnt quite a bit myself from those students. Together we gained lots of ideas how we can cooperate closer in the future. I invited them to the OpenTechSummit and the LXDE Asian Summit which we are organizing as a partner from May 4-10 in Taipei and I am looking forward to get involved in more events with LinuxNUS in the future. LinuxNUS, thanks for your great work and organisation!

lxde-singapore-linuxnus

lxde-singapore-meetup-presentation

Fotos: GOH Lu Feng

Liveblogging by GOH Lu Feng: After talking about the business opportunities with LXDE, Mario is now talking about the community at LXDE. An interesting fact about LXDE Project is that the founder of the Project, alias PCMan, is actually a medical doctor! A very prominent member of the LXDE community is Klaus Knopper, also the creator of Knoppix LiveCD. In fact, the recent release of Knoppix has moved from having KDE to LXDE as the default desktop environment. One of the key messages from Mario is that an Open Source Project need both technical and non-technical members, as well as people with wide diversity in order for an Open Source Project to be successful. Mario also gave an anecdote of a student in Taiwan who actively contributed to LXDE. This student enjoyed development work and was netted an internship with the Open Source Foundry in Taiwan, due to his involvement and experience with Open Source Development. Mario also mentioned that he is able to get openSUSE to sponsor usb sticks if anyone is able to produce a light version of openSUSE with LXDE. To be updated: Details steps on how to contribute to the LXDE project and GSOC LXDE Projects. Todo: Help LXDE advertise abt GSOC to the Singapore Universities. (http://linuxnus.org/2009/03/11/live-blogging-at-lxde-talk-mar-09/)

We had dinner at Dover after the talk. The food was great and so was the company. Quite a few ideas popped out from the conversations. One suggestion from Mario was to organise some girl only events to attract girls into Open Source. This has been a successfully practiced in Taiwan. Another idea that is likely to be worked on is to organise FOSS.SG. (http://linuxnus.org/2009/03/12/lxde-talk-mar-09-aftermath/)

Summer of Code: Please submit your project ideas

Google Summer of Code

I have submitted our application for the Google Summer of Code 2009 and we are looking forward to the participation of the LXDE project. We are applying with LXDE and PCMan File Manager as dedicated software projects.

We are gathering project ideas for LXDE in the wiki.  If you are interested to join LXDE at the summer of code and would like to discuss project ideas, please also join us on IRC at irc.oftc.net #lxde.

Ideas for the PCMan File Manager project are on a seperate project page here: PCMan File Manager Ideas. The pages will be continuously updated with more information starting at the week from Monday, March 16, 2009.

Please visit our idea pages and add your project ideas. We are looking forward to your involvement and contributions!

LXDE Project Ideas: http://wiki.lxde.org/en/Google_Summer_of_Code_2009

PMan File Manger Project Ideas:  http://wiki.lxde.org/en/PCMan_File_Manager_Ideas